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New Safety Rules After Fatal Crane Collapse

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is seeking to implement new safety rules only days after the tragic Tribeca Crane Collapse. Specifically, the mayor is reducing the wind-speed threshold at which such equipment, like a crawler crane, must be shut down.

That change is expected to take effect immediately. It is one of many new policies that the Mayor announced over the weekend as Department of Buildings and OSHA investigators continue to pour through evidence to try and determine the specific cause of this fatal accident. The changes also are being proposed as the city is facing intense scrutiny.

Tribeca Crane Collapse: Details Continue to Emerge

The Tribeca Crane Collapse investigation continues to develop. Currently, reports maintain that investigators are continuing to work with the theory that the windy conditions that morning caused this tragedy. Investigators are hoping to remove the more than 650,000 pound crane from the crowded streets of Tribeca. To do so, they will cut this massive machine into as many as 35 smaller pieces. This will allow life in downtown Manhattan to feel like it has returned to normal. But, this accident should forever change what the word 'normal' means in the construction industry.

Tragic Crane Accident In Tribeca

A tragic crane accident in Manhattan today is the latest in a string of noteworthy construction accidents in New York City. On the morning of Friday, February 5, 2016, one person was killed and two others seriously injured when an enormous crane collapsed in the Tribeca section of Lower Manhattan. Tragically, a bystander was killed when the crane fell on him. His name has not been released. The two injured people were taken to Bellevue Hospital where they are undergoing emergency treatment.

Our thoughts and prayers go out to the victims and their family members.

Construction Worker Falls to His Death in Harlem

A 62-year-old construction worker fell to his death when he slipped and fell from a fire escape, causing him to plummet six stories down to the ground in the rear of 124 East 107th Street, East Harlem, New York. The victim was replacing the gutters of the building. Reports indicate that he was not utilizing a safety harness or any safety equipment while working at an elevated height. The victim was pronounced dead at the scene.

Our thoughts and prayers go out to those who loved him.

Lower Manhattan Crane Collapse Kills One, Leaves Two In Serious Condition

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We have written extensively on this blog about the current construction boom in New York City and the risk that cutting corners and negligence play in risking the health and safety of New Yorkers and the people around the world who visit our great city.

2015: The Year In NYC Injuries, Part One

Welcome to part one of our look back on our blog's injury-related posts of 2015.

We hope that calling attention to these injuries will help spread the word about the rights of the injured, making it more likely that negligent parties are held accountable for the injuries and deaths their actions cause.

What Goes Up Must Come Down: What You Need To Know After A Fall

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"What goes up must come down." - Isaac Newton

Gravity is a simple concept that we often take for granted. Ideally, things come back down to earth in a controlled manner that is safe for everyone in the vicinity.

Study: Buffalo & Rochester Area Fails Construction Safety Test

A recent study shows that an alarming number of construction sites in Western New York are woefully failing to provide their employees with a safe place to work. Not by coincidence, this study was released as New York State continues to experience a spike in serious construction accidents and fatalities. Worker safety needs to become a greater focus with politicians, the media and New Yorkers. The problem isn't going away.