New York Construction Accident Resources

You Have Rights

As a construction worker, you are legally entitled to a safe workplace. Although construction has its risks, you should never feel forced to work in an environment in which you feel unsafe or know there are hazards present. There are various resources available to help you learn about worker rights, hazards to watch out for, and what you can do if you are involved in a construction accident. Feel free to explore the pages below to learn more. If you would like to speak with one of our expert construction accident attorneys, you can contact us through our free case review form or call us at 212-736-5300.

National Resources

There are numerous organizations dedicated to providing information about the construction industry and construction safety, most prominently the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Below are links to websites that will explain your rights as a construction worker, how to request an inspection of your work site, and how to prevent accidents from occurring, among other things. These pages apply to workers from all over the United States; information pertaining specifically to construction workers in New York State is further below.

  • OSHA Employee Workplace Rights
    This page gives a brief rundown of your rights to a safe workplace under federal law, in addition to access to the official OSHA Workers' Rights booklet. There is a Spanish version of the booklet here. You can also learn when and how to file a complaint, as well as where the OSHA regional and area offices are and how to contact them.
  • A Summary of OSHA's Employee Workplace Rights
    This page provides a concrete explanation of your worker rights under OSHA, all on one page for easy access. There are links to the official regulations, statutes, and forms on OSHA's website.
  • OSHA Construction Industry
    Browse this page for information, tools, and resources on all things related to construction, including safety. The goal of these pages is to help both workers and employers "identify, reduce, and eliminate construction-related hazards."
  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health - Construction
    This page focuses on preventing work-related illness, injury, disability, and death by providing national and global information and scientific research on different aspects of construction work. The objective is to translate that information into solutions and services specifically meant to meet the needs of construction workers. Search here for information on various construction topics, including things like Electrical Safety, Machine Safety, and resources for immigrant workers, as well as articles on preventing fatalities and injuries in construction.
  • OSHA Worker Safety Series: Construction Resource Manual
    In addition to the many pages on construction OSHA has on its site, OSHA also has a "pocket guide" detailing various common hazards on construction sites-like ladders, scaffolding, and cranes-and providing solutions in order to avoid these hazards and prevent accidents.
  • Electronic Library of Construction Occupational Safety & Health (ELCOSH)
    This page is largely informational, consisting of pages on a wide variety of construction topics. Their aim is to "provide accurate, user-friendly information about safety and health" to construction workers and employers. Content on their site includes training materials, research reports, and videos on worker safety.
  • Scaffold & Access Industry Association (SAIA)
    Peruse this site for safety information focused on scaffolding. In addition to a job search feature and pages on scaffold-specific topics-like mast climbing and construction hoists-they have also compiled a list of OSHA-approved resources meant to educate workers on the proper way to perform work using the typical industry equipment.
  • The Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR)
    This website works to provide the latest research and resources on construction and construction safety. Explore pages on trench safety, nail gun safety, working in cold and hot weather, the latest research on the safety climate in the construction industry, and how to make your work site safer.

Local Resources

  • New York State Workers' Compensation Board
    If you've been injured on the job, the New York State Workers' Compensation Board website provides a wealth of resources for workers who have questions about workers' compensation. Almost every piece of information about workers' comp can be found here, including how to navigate the claim process, steps to take if you are injured on the job, and links for help finding rehabilitation and social services.
  • New York State Public Employee Safety and Health Bureau
    If you are a construction worker based in New York, the Public Employee Safety and Health Bureau (PESH)-a division of the New York Department of Safety and Health-provides similar services to OSHA, but is strictly local. PESH can conduct inspections of work sites as well as respond to complaints from public sector employees. This page answers more questions about PESH and provides guidance for filing a work site complaint.
  • New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH)
    NYCOSH is an organization that advocates for the rights of all occupational workers in New York, while also aiming to educate workers about their rights. Some of their initiatives include the reformation of the Scaffold Law (Labor Law 240) and advocacy for immigrant workers' rights. They also have resources on the site specifically for injured workers, and publish an annual report called "Deadly Skyline" informing the public of the construction fatalities in New York State during that year and pushing for better working conditions.

New York Construction Accident Attorneys

The attorneys at Block O'Toole & Murphy understand that a construction accident can completely upend your life. If you or a loved one has been injured in a construction accident due to another person's negligence, you know that the stress of trying to let your injuries heal-and paying for all the necessary medical care-while attempting to navigate a lawsuit can be overwhelming. However, you have options. Aside from the resources on this page, there is more help available. Our skilled construction accident attorneys have years of experience handling a variety of construction cases.

Select results include:

  • $110,174,972.38 verdict for a 23-year-old cyclist who was paralyzed after he was struck by a falling railroad tie
  • $12,000,000 settlement for a local 147 tunnel worker who sustained various injuries when he fell 40 feet into a ventilation shaft
  • $11,500,000 settlement for a union worker who suffered severe wrist injuries while using a defective saw that was missing its safety guard
  • $11,000,000 settlement for a masonry foreman who fell three stories through an unsecured hole cover and was left permanently disabled
  • $10,875,000 jury verdict for a local 731 union worker who sustained internal injuries after he fell off a building and was impaled on unguarded steel rebar
  • $7,300,000 settlement for a construction worker who had to have his arm amputated after a 10,000-pound steel beam fell on the top right side of his body
  • $6,250,000 settlement for a construction worker who suffered from quadriplegia after he fell nine feet while performing framing work
  • $5,885,000 jury verdict for an undocumented worker who sustained severe wrist, arm, and back injuries after falling from a ladder
  • $5,500,000 settlement for a 54-year-old construction worker who suffered various injuries, ultimately becoming disabled from employment, after he was struck by a rotating excavator

You deserve the full amount of compensation possible, including coverage for lost wages, medical bills, and other damages. Call us at 212-736-5300 or fill out our contact form to speak with a qualified construction accident attorney today.

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