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Cesarean section may lead to infection or other complications

Cesarean births are on rise in cities across the country, and New York City is no exception. During this delivery process, women and infants may sustain injuries, develop infections and complications or even die during or after the birth. Doctors' failure to monitor vital signs and symptoms may eventually cause damage to women or their babies in the Cesarean process.

Obstetricians participating in the International Breech Birth Conference have expressed concerns for the considerable increase in Cesarean rates and the associated risks in the United States. Reportedly, the post Cesarean-section mortality rate is rising in the country due to placenta-related complications. Maternal mortalities have doubled in America in the last 25 years and the data are apparently under-reported.

Experts recommend that doctors avoid unnecessary C-sections. Placental problems become a concern for women undergoing C-sections. Furthermore, such issues pose a bigger threat to women who have already undergone a Cesarean. These women are at risk to lose their baby, their uterus or even their life. Sources say that a C-section triples the risk to the mother and it is equally unsafe for the baby.

Because of the greater risk involved, doctors performing a C-section should be very careful, as minor mistake can be fatal for mothers. Obstetricians should perform this process only after ensuring that the procedure will be safe for the patient.

A close watch in post-cesarean phase by doctors is also required. Chances of infections or other complications are likely after surgical delivery. These should be diligently diagnosed and treated.

A doctor's negligence during a C-section may prove fatal. It may cause life-threatening complications and injuries to the mother as well as the baby.

Source: Your Birth Coach, "International Breech Birth Conference: Long Term Risks of Cesarean," Dr. Nancy, Dec. 21, 2012